What Temp Should Roast Beef Be Cooked To

How to Cut and Carve Beef Roast

Slicing meat against (or across) the grain yields tender slices of meat. Meat grain resembles wood grain in appearance. You can shorten the muscle fibers by cutting against the grain; the longer the fibers, the more difficult it is to chew. Because the grain direction varies in some meat cuts, pay attention to it and adjust the slicing direction as necessary.

You only need leftover drippings to make savory, mouthwatering gravy. Scrape up any browned bits in the bottom of your roasting pan, no matter how much is left. If the roasting pan is stovetop safe, add the wine or broth and simmer over medium-high heat. Mix the mixture until it becomes thick, or add flour to achieve the right consistency. Add some red wine, balsamic vinegar, cream, sautéed shallots or mushrooms, or a few dabs of your favorite jam or jelly to amp up the flavor even further.

When placed on a warm platter and sliced for convenience of serving, roast beef looks classy and filling. If you’ve also roasted vegetables, place them around the meat. Roasted carrots, turnips or potatoes add colour and texture. Add a few fresh sprigs of the herbs you used for seasoning as a garnish. Provide sauce or gravy in a separate dish or gravy boat so that guests can help themselves to as much as they like.

Internal Beef Temperature Matters

If you’ve ever wondered how restaurants manage to cook their steaks and burgers to such perfection, it’s because they have skilled chefs working behind the scenes, but you can achieve the same quality at home with a meat thermometer.

Using an instant-read thermometer is the #1 way to tell when your beef is cooked to the right temperature (see below for how to properly use a meat thermometer).

Not only does cooking steak to the right temperature guarantee food safety, but it also results in the tastiest possible steak. Nothing is worse than overcooking a beef cut that you just spent a lot of money on, especially pricey cuts like prime rib.

But cooking beef is so simple. You just need to measure the proper beef temperature!.

This post covers everything you need to know about cooking meat to a delicious and safe temperature, whether you’re making a roast, chuck roast, ground meat, or the ideal steak.

What Temp Should Roast Beef Be Cooked To

Beef, Lamb, Pork and Veal Roasting Chart

Minimum internal temperature = 145°F (63°C). Allow to rest for at least 3 minutes.
Type Oven °F/°C Timing
Beef
Rib roast, bone-in 4 to 6 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 23 to 25 min/lb.
Rib roast, boneless 4 to 6 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 28 to 33 min/lb.
Round or rump roast 2 ½ to 4 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 30 to 35 min/lb.
Tenderloin roast, whole 4 to 6 lbs. 425°F (218°C) 45 to 60 minutes total
Lamb
Leg, bone-in 5 to 7 lbs. 7 to 9 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 20 to 25 min/lb. 10 to 15 min/lb.
Leg, boneless, rolled 4 to 7 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 25 to 30 min/lb.
Shoulder roast 3 to 4 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 30 to 35 min/lb.
Fresh Pork
Loin roast, bone-in or boneless 2 to 5 lbs. 350°F (177°C) 20 min/lb.
Crown roast 10 lbs. 350°F (177°C) 12 min/lb.
Tenderloin ½ to 1 ½ lbs. 425°F (218°C) – 450°F (232°C) 20 to 27 minutes total
Boston butt 3 to 6 lbs. 350°F (177°C) 45 min./lb.
Ribs 2 to 4 lbs. 350°F (177°C) 1 ½ to 2 hours (or until fork tender)
Veal
Rib roast 4 to 5 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 25 to 27 min/lb.
Loin 3 to 4 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 34 to 36 min/lb.
Set oven temperature to 325°F (163°C)
Type Weight Timing
Smoked Ham, cook before eating Cook to a minimum internal temperature of 145°F (63°C) and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes.
Whole, bone-in 10 to 14 lbs. 18 to 20 min/lb.
Half, bone-in 5 to 7 lbs. 22 to 25 min/lb.
Shank or butt portion, bone-in 3 to 4 lbs. 35 to 40 min/lb.
Arm picnic shoulder, boneless 5 to 8 lbs. 30 to 35 min/lb.
Shoulder roll (butt), boneless 2 to 4 lbs. 35 to 40 min/lb.
Smoked Ham, cooked Reheat cooked hams packaged in USDA-inspected plants to a minimum internal temperature of 140°F (60°C) and all others to 165°F (74°C).
Whole, bone in 10 to 14 lbs. 15 to 18 min/lb.
Half, bone in 5 to 7 lbs. 18 to 24 min/lb.
Arm picnic shoulder, boneless 5 to 8 lbs. 25 to 30 min/lb.
Canned ham, boneless 3 to 10 lbs. 15 to 20 min/lb.
Vacuum packed, boneless 6 to 12 lbs. 10 to 15 min/lb.
Spiral cut, whole or half 7 to 9 lbs. 10 to 18 min/lb.
Fresh ham, uncooked Cook to a minimum internal temperature of 145°F (63°C) and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes.
Whole leg, bone in 12 to 16 lbs. 22 to 26 min/lb.
Whole leg, boneless 10 to 14 lbs. 24 to 28 min/lb.
Half, bone in 5 to 8 lbs. 35 to 40 min/lb.
Country ham Cook to a minimum internal temperature of 145°F (63°C) and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes.
Whole or half
  1. Soak 4 to 12 hours in refrigerator.
  2. Cover with water, then boil 20 to 25 minutes per pound.
  3. Drain the ham and cook at 400°F (204°C) for 15 minutes to brown.

The times shown below are for unstuffed poultry. Add 15 to 30 minutes for stuffed birds. In the center of the stuffing, the internal temperature should reach 165°F (74°C).

Minimum internal temperature = 165°F (74°C) Check the internal temperature in the innermost part of the thigh, innermost part of the wing, and thickest part of the breast.
Type Oven °F/°C Timing
Chicken, whole 3 to 4 lbs 5 to 7 lbs. 350°F (177°C) 1 ¼ to 1 ½ hours 2 to 2 ¼ hours
Chicken, breast halves, bone-in6 to 8 oz. 350°F (177°C) 30 to 40 minutes
Chicken, breast halves, boneless4 oz. 350°F (177°C) 20 to 30 minutes
Capon, whole 4 to 8 lbs. 350°F (177°C) 2 to 3 hours
Cornish hen, whole 18 to 24 oz. 350°F (177°C) 50 to 60 minutes
Duck, whole (do not stuff) 4 to 6 lbs. 350°F (177°C) 30 to 35 min/lb
Duck, legs or thighs 325°F (163°C) 1 ¼ to 1 ½ hours
Young goose, whole 8 to 12 lbs. 325°F (163°C) 2 ½ to 3 hours
Young goose, pieces or cut up 325°F (163°C) 2 hours