How Long To Cook Beef Tenderloin In Oven At 350

Beef Tenderloin Roast Instructions

For such a fancy cut recipe, this one is surprisingly simple. Scroll down to the recipe card for detailed instructions. Here are the basic steps:

  • You start by bringing the roast to room temperature. This will help it cook more evenly.
  • Assemble the spices and olive oil in a small bowl. (Photos 1-3).
  • After patting the beef dry, apply the mixture all over it. (Photo 4).
  • Insert an oven-safe meat thermometer into the roasts thickest part. Cook it in an extremely hot oven (500°F) for 15 minutes. (Photo 5).
  • Once the roast reaches an internal temperature of 130°F, reduce the oven temperature to 350°F and continue cooking it. Using a small 2-lb. roast, this should take 20-30 minutes. Utilizing a meat thermometer is the only surefire method to find out.
  • To stop the juices from leaking out when you cut into the roast, let it rest before slicing it.
  • Gently remove the butcher twine, then slice the roast. (Photo 6).

How Long To Cook Beef Tenderloin In Oven At 350

I usually get this roast at Whole Foods. Every time I get a small roast, the butchers are happy to cut it up and tie it with butcher twine.

Therefore, don’t hesitate to ask! Although it’s not hard to tie yourself, it’s best to leave it to the experts.

No. The tenderloin is an elongated cut from near the cows rear. Its an area that doesnt get exercised by the animal, which is why its so tender. Filet mignon is not a whole roast. Its a steak that comes from the part of the tenderloin that goes into the short loin. Each tenderloin can produce just a few filet mignon steaks, which are the cows most tender parts. A drawing of cow parts showing where the tenderloin is.

Theres no need to sear it. We can avoid the extra step of searing by letting it brown nicely for 15 minutes in a superhot 500°F oven.

You should cook it uncovered. You want it to get browned. This is achieved by leaving it uncovered.

When cooking roasts, one of the best tools you can use is an oven-safe meat thermometer that you can set to alert you when the meat reaches your desired temperature. You dont want to overcook an expensive roast, and you also dont want the middle to remain completely raw. Ideally, you want the inside to be medium-rare, 130°F. (The USDA recommends cooking roasts to an internal temperature of 145°F.)

It’s crucial to give the roast 30 minutes to rest before slicing it. The period of rest enables the temperature to level off and the fluids to settle and redistribute. If you cut into the roast too soon, the delicious juices will be lost, and the meat will become drier.

Usually, I pair a roast beef tenderloin with one of these side dishes:

Sometimes I serve it with brown butter sauce. Melt 4 tablespoons salted butter in a small saucepan over medium heat to make brown butter. Cook it for a little while longer until it begins to brown, then turn off the heat. Drizzle the beef slices with the brown butter after slicing the roast.

The leftovers store well for three to four days in the refrigerator in an airtight container. I would rather not reheat them in order to prevent the meat from drying out.

Nonetheless, if you would like to reheat them, cover them and microwave them gently at 50% power.

Cold roast beef slices with grainy mustard, crisp-cut vegetables, and pickles like these pickled red onions are some of my favorite lunchtime fare.

How Long To Cook Beef Tenderloin In Oven At 350

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How Long To Cook Beef Tenderloin In Oven At 350

  • 2 lb. beef tenderloin roast
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • ▢ Two teaspoons of kosher salt, Diamond Crystal (not fine table salt)
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage
  • Take the roast out of the refrigerator an hour before you intend to cook it.
  • Preheat your oven to 500°F. To make cleanup easier, line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and insert a wire rack into it.
  • Pat the beef dry with paper towels. To guarantee that the roast cooks evenly, tuck in any thinner ends and secure with butcher’s twine. Another option is to have your butcher tie it for you.
  • Combine the spices and olive oil, then coat the entire beef with the mixture using your clean hands.
  • Place the roast on the wire rack. Insert an oven-safe meat thermometer into its thickest part. Put it in the oven and roast it at 500°F for 15 minutes.
  • Lower the oven temperature to 350°F. Roast for a further 20 to 30 minutes, or until the thermometer reads 130°F (medium-rare).
  • Transfer the roast to a cutting board. After loosely covering it with foil, give it 30 minutes to rest.
  • Slice, then serve after carefully removing the butcher twine, which you can cut with kitchen scissors and then gently pull out of the meat.
  • Nutrition info is based on CalorieKing.com.
  • Roasts should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145°F and rested for three minutes, according to USDA guidelines.
  • Brown butter sauce optional: In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt 4 tablespoons salted butter. Cook it for a little while longer until it begins to brown, then turn off the heat. Drizzle the beef slices with the brown butter after slicing the roast.
  • The leftovers store well for three to four days in the refrigerator in an airtight container. I would rather not reheat them in order to prevent the meat from drying out. However, if you’d like to reheat them, cover them and microwave on high power for a minute or two.

A Rare Case: What’s the Best Degree of Doneness for Beef Tenderloin?

I used to be one of those people who would “wave the steak toward the fire and serve it to me.” The rarer, the better. However, instead of letting my slight machismo get the better of me, I began to question what was in my mouth, and I’m willing to bet that anyone who was under the impression that rarer things were always better could be persuaded otherwise.

These days, I really think that when cooking red meat, the amount of fat it contains should be directly correlated with the doneness to which the meat is cooked. Rich, fatty cuts, such as prime-grade prime rib, are best prepared to a minimum of medium-rare, and frequently even up to medium-rare; this is the temperature at which the abundant intramuscular fat begins to soften and spread its flavor and lubricant throughout your mouth. *.

*In fact, even ardent lovers of rare meats consistently chose the medium-rare or medium prime rib over the rare in blindfolded taste tests I carried out. This could also be the reason why Americans tend to prefer their meat medium-rare while French people prefer their very lean beef cooked rare. There’s no logical explanation for why British people cook their lean beef over-done.

However, lean tenderloin has no intramuscular fat, so cooking it past medium-rare will only dry it out. Tenderloin should be perfectly pink from edge to edge, with maybe a hint of translucent rare meat in the center. Naturally, for flavor and texture, we still want a really nice dark crust on the outside.

Where to Buy a Beef Tenderloin and Packaging Notes

You should be aware of the types of packaging and where to buy beef tenderloin before preheating the oven.

  • Specialty butcher shops and upscale grocery stores may carry beef tenderloin roasts if your neighborhood supermarket does not. Some warehouse stores carry whole beef tenderloins.
  • Beef tenderloin roast is also called a filet mignon roast. It is the most tender cut of beef.
  • You can buy a tenderloin in the cryo-vac. If so, you’ll have to cut and prepare the tenderloin yourself. There will be some waste if you trim it yourself. You can also buy them trimmed, and ready to go.
  • Make sure the silverskin covering the meat has been removed from your tenderloin when you purchase it already trimmed. Occasionally, the butcher might occasionally leave some of it on the roast. The roast will be tough where that silver skin is still present if you don’t remove it.